Citizen Generated Urban and Rural Data for Citizen-Centric Smart Sustainable Cities and Diaspora Change Makers

Event Flyer Citizen Generated Data

Happening Tomorrow

Citizen Generated Urban and Rural Data for Citizen-Centric Smart Sustainable Cities and Diaspora Change Makers

Time: 2:00 PM Est | 1:00 PM Jamaica  | 7:00 PM UK

Register to participate or join us on Facebook Live            https://www.facebook.com/MagateWildhorse/

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Presenter: Roza Vasileva

Roza is a PhD Candidate in Digital Economy and Sr. Digital Development Consultant at the World Bank Group.  She has been actively involved in related work in Africa and have contributed to the agenda of the World Economic Forum. She has conducted research in the areas of  using data especially open government data and citizen generated urban data for designing citizen-centric smart sustainable cities. Roza holds an undergraduate degree in Public Relations from Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia in St. Petersburg and a dual master’s degree in Public Administration and International Affairs from  Maxwell School of Syracuse University where she was a Fulbright Scholar. Since 2012 she  serves as an ICT and Open Data consultant to the World Bank’s Transport and ICT Global Practice. At the World Bank she focuses on Open Government Data and Digital Government projects in over a dozen countries including Tanzania, Mauritius, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, India, Kazakhstan, and Russia.

Why You Cannot Afford to Miss This Event

It is known that local actions by citizens and their contribution to providing data, raising issues as well as contributing to monitoring and evaluation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are crucial to the success in meeting the targets.  If we have learnt nothing from the harsh blows of COVID-19 in the BCAME diaspora (Black, Caribbean, Asian and other Minority Ethnic Groups) communities, we have learnt about the importance of not having community data. We have learnt the high price of not having evidence. We have learnt that government cannot generate all the data for supporting plans and policies for effecting the needed transformation in our communities.

We have seen how evidence in the form of videos recordings have helped in the fight against racial injustice the case of George Floyd being among the most notable. But it the data we generate can also help in other ways when it comes to ensuring what matters to you in relation to topics such as social injustice, climate change, mental health, economic inequality, education, entrepreneurship and modern day slavery are included on policy agendas, budgets, action plans, and studies among other. What gets measured gets funded!

Being commitment and having the capacity to generate our own data as entrepreneur communities and diaspora communities will make a significant difference in advancing our progress.  Evaluation is said to have the biggest multiplier effect in driving the delivery of the SDGs. It can work for you in making strong strategy plans, programmes, evaluation and delivering the evidence for ensuring your relevance, ensuring your inclusion and participation as well as transparency and accountability.

Businesses and entrepreneurs must also commit to contributing the voluntary national reporting on the SDGs by their cities and countries. Today only a quarter of businesses do so, change has to move from local to global, we must own, participate in and ensure accountability in relation the transformation that is needed by our communities and businesses.

Join us tomorrow learn what, how and the connection to the SDGs from expert Roza Vasileva.

Come ready to ask questions and to seek guidance for improving your programmes in the Q & A session.

Request the registration link at magate.wildhorse(at) gmail.com  or join us live on https://www.facebook.com/MagateWildhorse/

The Marathoner

Moderator: Meegan Scott,  B.Sc. Hons, MBA, CTM, ATM-B, CL, PMP

Brought to you by Magate Wildhorse and The Community of Practice for Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs

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For Immediate Release: Simon Anholt to Address National Image at free Online Seminar for Caribbean & Diaspora SMEs

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TORONTO, Canada – Simon Anholt of  The Good Country Index will be the guest speaker at the “Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar”  which will be held today, June 18, 2020 at 2:00 pm.

Mr. Anholt  will address the topic “Doing Good, Doing Well: The Secret of National Image”.

The how and key ingredients for building national brands that attract wealth and drives sustainable development is the focus of the session.  Business leaders, community service organizations, representatives of government departments, stakeholders in the tourism and hospitality sector with an interest in national brands, brand reputation, and how to strengthen and leverage them for boosting post COVID 19 economic recovery are invited to attend.

Members of the Caribbean diaspora with plans to leverage their national brands for profit and purpose will benefit from the knowledge and insights to be shared.

“Simon Anholt is one of the most influential and respected advisors to the leaders of countries seeking to enhance their competitiveness in the global marketplace.”, says the Economist. He is the founder and publisher of The Good Country Index.  Mr. Anholt has advised governments of 56 nations to help them to improve their economic, political and cultural engagements with the international community, and by raising their profiles, to enhance their trade, tourism, diplomatic and cultural relations, talent and investment attraction.

 Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, Competitive Identity: the New Brand Management for Nations, Cities and Regions(Palgrave Macmillan 2007); and Places: Image, Identity and Reputation (Palgrave Macmillan 2010) are among the books he has authored.

Other speakers at the seminar will be Theo Chambers of CaribAcademy, Andrew Sharpe of  Authentic Caribbean Foundation, Dr. Karren Dunkley, Representative  of  Jamaica Diaspora Northeast, USA, and Meegan Scott of Magate Wildhorse Consulting.

The event is the 10th in the series hosted by Magate Wildhorse Consulting and The Community of Practice for Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs. Today’s event partner  is the Jamaica Diaspora Northeast USA.  The month of  June is being celebrated as Caribbean-American Heritage Month, while the week of June 14-20 is also being celebrated as Jamaica Diaspora Week 2020.

There is no charge for participating in the event.

For details and registration link, email: magate.wildhorse@gmail.com

Or visit the event links at:

https://magatewildhorse.ca/outride-covid-19-can-your-national-brand-attract-the-big-spend/

https://www.facebook.com/events/256720838919704

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https://twitter.com/MagateWildhorse/status/1273548957088722947?s=20

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Save The Date: COVID 19 Opportunities — SDGs, Evaluation, Performance & Your Pivot

Evaluation Session in 9 Save the Date

Mark your calendars!

Coming to you Thursday, June 11, 2020                                                                  COVID 19 Opportunities — SDGs, Evaluation, Performance & Your Pivot

Time: 2:00 PM EST [Toronto & New York] | 1:00 PM Jamaica                                                      7:00 PM UK  | 8:00 PM Zambia

Rescheduled:  To be held,  Friday, June 12, 2020  @ 2:00 PM EST.

Registration: Free  | New participants pre-register at the link below 

https://forms.gle/PtpZAT8czWYExWpZ7

About the series:

https://magatewildhorse.ca/outride-covid-19-business-threat-seminar-2/

Watch this space for session topics and speaker details!

We are proud partners in the Eval4Action Movement and Campaign.

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Decade of Evaluation for Action — Join Eval4Action

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The global evaluation community is coming together to help make the #SDGs a reality.  While the world copes with #COVID19, now is the time to rely on evidence-based decisions.

The Decade of #Eval4Action is now.

“We commit to influential evaluation”                                                                                “We commit to facilitating use of evaluation”                                                                 “We commit to building partnerships on evaluation”                                                          “We commit to supporting Young and Emerging Evaluators” among others.

Won’t you join us?

Find out more at: eval4action.org

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#Eval4Action #DecadeOfAction #Agenda2030 #GlobalGoals #SDGs

 

 

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Outride COVID 19: Diaspora Supply Chain― Who’s Who

Supply Chain Seminar

Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar

“Embracing risk for driving vision and growth”

The series is grounded in risk intelligence (RI). RI is that process of embracing risks and putting it to work for ensuring your business can survive or thrive during a crisis and beyond. It is also about value creation and protection.

You are invited to join us for series five in the Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar.

Diaspora Supply Chain― Who’s Who

This edition will present:

  • industry update related to supply chains and the impact of COVID 19
  • strategies for making your supply chain more resilient
  • information sources for enabling you to shore up your supply chain or
  • to benefit from business opportunities presented by big business and government looking to secure their supplies and de-risks their supply chain

When: May 14, 2020  |  Time: 2:00 PM EST | Toronto & New York

Where: Online  | Registration detail below

Cost: Free

Event features: Joy Spot activity, Mouth and Mind discussion, COVID 19 business community experiences (open mic―diaspora, in Caribbean, other representatives of BAME or mainstream peers), Elevator pitches (The first 20 registered to per series), networking session

.Featured Sessions include:

Disaster Risk Financing: CCRIF, Climate Risks and COVID-19, presented by Gina Sanguinetti-Phillips, Program Manager at Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF SPC).   In attendance will be Elizabeth Emanuel, Sustainability Management Team Lead, CCRIF

Gina Saguinetti Philips 2

Gina, is an expert in sustainability and environmental policy management. She is a former Environmental Education Advisor to the National Environment and Planning Agency of Jamaica, and American Journal expert.  Her academic background spans the fields of engineering, computer science, environment and sustainability.

Digital Transformation – Process Pivots for COVID 19 and Beyond, presented by Jennifer Clémence Graham, Managing Director and Senior Consultant at JG&G Consulting Services Inc. expert in IT, Business Process Re-engineering and digital transformation

Jennifer Graham

Jennifer brings “25 years of professional credibility working worldwide as a management and business consultant for her firm JG&G Consulting Services Inc., providing professional services to executives in Financial Services, Governments, Healthcare, IT, Oil & Gas, Telecommunications, Utilities, and in other industries.

Ms Graham is an SME in OCM, ITIL, project and portfolio management, change management, process re-design, and their related tools, techniques and strategies. She has extensive experience as a speaker, facilitator, and trainer in the corporate environment, and has taught at Universities and Colleges”.

The MarathonerMeegan Scott of Magate Wildhorse Consulting will address the topic “Supply Chain― Diaspora Who’s Who for Outriding COVID 19” as well as present a network governance framework for cooperation and leveraging intelligence for improving diaspora and home country outcomes. For almost two decades Meegan has helped organizational leaders across industries and geographical borders to get better results from their strategy development, planning, and execution processes.  She is the founder and owner of Magate Wildhorse Ltd. Her most recent in Caribbean engagements includes Climate Finance Strategy Planning, business incubation, and  corporate strategy planner to the National Environment and Planning Agency of Jamaica.

Theo Chambers

Theo Chambers, Motivational Speaker and Business Coach Consultant, at CaribAcademy and Co-founder of Positive Tourism News (Jamaica) will deliver the Joy Spot, Motivational Talk.

Theo is also a tourism expert, author and former president of the Hanover Chamber of Commerce.

 

Other speakers at the seminar will include Philip Bedward of Pathways, Andrew Sharpe of  Authentic Caribbean Foundation and Rudi Page of Making Connections Work and rapporteur, Tonny Ng’uni, Principal Consultant at Magton Ltd (Zambia).

Diaspora Supply Chain― Who’s Who  is the fifth and final of  in the series of business continuity and growth seminars which will be followed by execution and improvement interventions.

Registration Options

New to the series

To receive your access link to the seminar please register at the link below.

https://forms.gle/PtpZAT8czWYExWpZ7

Returning attendees

Email us at magate.wildhorse (at)gmail.com  or click here.                                                Copy and paste the following in the subject line and body of your Email                          “Register me for Diaspora Supply Chain― Who’s Who for Outriding COVID 19 ”  please include your name.

All attendee must click the join meeting link provided before the start of the meeting to receive your unique log in credentials.

Procurement officers and buyers in search of COVID 19 and other supplies are welcome to participate.

Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar is a global disapora entrepreneurs affair!                                                                                                                            Leaders of mainstream businesses with an interest in doing business with diaspora entrepreneurs are welcome to register for the match making and networking sessions.

Please note that this event is not just for small and micro-businesses, big businesses and big nonprofits can benefit also.

Do Something

 

Wear A Mask Save A Life Magate Covid Message

Brought to you by Magate Wildhorse Consulting, and The Community of Practise for Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Home of BIDEM Conference & Trade Show)

Advance or maintain the progress.

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Gender in Development Work, Is It Really New?

gender and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gender as a key consideration in development work is not new.

It is just being given greater consideration across different sectors and by more actors.

There is  also a shift in the primary, if not singular focus on the challenges and inequities faced by women and girls to include issues, impacts, and challenges faced by men and boys.

In fact, gender and development has been a topic in academic circles since the 1950s. It gained greater popularity and saw more forward action in the 1970s.

So, is it new to the Caribbean?

Absolutely not, as in the global community there is a greater focus and increased consideration by more actors in development.  One need not go further than The Message (1976), by Neville Martin which included political praise for  Jamaica’s Employment (Equal Pay for Men and Women) Act of 1975.

The lines “He gave I a message to all those people who nuh love progress, say to jook them with land lease, say to jook with land lease, jook them with the pioneer corps, jook them with the pioneer corps,  jook them with JAMAL, then you jook them with free education, jook them with free education, equal pay for women, equal pay for women”; jook them with the minimum wage”. Speaks to gender consideration in development in Jamaica for at least four decades.

In 1998, I joined the USAID funded ACES Project of the Construction Resource and Development Centre (CRDC), a Jamaican not-for-profit and Environmental NGO, that was established in 1983 to deliver and support work for improving shelter standards in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

Gender was a key component in the development of all training materials, social marketing, design and development of solutions, as well as in the management arrangement for solutions to be administered by community groups― where applicable.

The Women’s Construction Collective (WCC), a successful project of the CRDC, also established in 1983, with the purpose being― to provide employment, as well as to increase and improve the status and participation of women in Jamaica’s construction sector is another example of gender consideration.  The first cohort comprised of women from the inner-city community of Tivoli Gardens in Jamaica.

WCC shared compound with CRDC and part of my responsibility was to manage the information center that was served by both entities. In fact, though I was on a contract to the ACES Project (Advancing Cooperation for Water, Sanitation, Health and Environment), I quickly came to learn that once with CRDC you were expected to support and promote all its projects, current, and independent. With that came the opportunity to support the WCC and WHAL (The Women’s Housing Advice Line), and the Sanitation Support Unit (SSU).

Given, the connection between water, sanitation, health, hygiene, environment, women, shelter, and disaster mitigation (all areas of priority focus for CRDC)― it made sense that the projects were designed to support each other; and that together they provided a wholistic approach to problem solving under the CRDC banner, as well as through their individual operations.

The Sanitation Support Unit (based in Montego Bay),  was an Urban Environmental Sanitation Program. SSU was also funded by USAID, and as with the ACES Project, the Environment Health Project (EHP) was the Washington DC, based USAID implementing partner.

SSU worked with communities across Jamaica and was a key co-implementation partner to the ACES Project, though its core catchment communities were Rose Heights and Norwood in Montego Bay.

The  focus of SSU was the provision of:

  • safe and affordable sanitation solution that suit the protected the environment (hence the introduction of the VIP latrines, and upgraded models developed under the ACES Project).
  • hygiene and behavior change training, solutions, and improved sanitation infrastructure for improved health;
  • training in related areas, and the delivery of solutions related to safe-rooves and retrofitting of on its own as well as in collaboration with ACES;
  • the disposal of solid waste, food safety, black and grey water were addressed by both projects, and in all instances and for every intervention gender consideration, and gender responsive solutions were a big consideration.

Gender in development is therefore not new, and certainly not new in the Caribbean. My experience at CRDC is also not the only one, but it was among the earliest.

Planners and programme designers have been including gender in development interventions for decades. However, with the growth of the evaluation movement, greater focus on equity and inclusion by donors, and gender mainstreaming as public policy in many jurisdictions has resulted in increased interest and advanced application of gender in development.

Courses such as “Equity-focused and Gender-responsive evaluation”, delivered by EvalPartners, in collaboration with UNICEF, and the International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE), has also served to increase the consciousness of evaluators and planners, alike when it comes to including gender in development interventions.

Increased focus on development interventions in the sphere of Market Systems Development is also driving the popularity and integration of gender in development in the developing world.

So, why did I even think it necessary to write this post?

I have found that many individuals in human resources, and contractors are very excited by the concept and for some it seems so new that they are in doubt that there are significant pools of individuals with experience in applying gender in development in the developing as well as the developed world.

I have also found that some professionals new to development work or performance management and measurement seem to believe this is a new concept and practice.

While it might be a big deal, it is certainly not new.

Thank you for sharing your early journey into the sphere of gender and development.

We look forward to hearing stories from Canada, the Caribbean, and the developing world in particular.

By Meegan Scott

 


Glossary

Who nuh love progress – who do not like or act to support progress

Jook – jab, poke, or slap (used figuratively in post and song)

Land Lease – A programme aimed a redistribution of land and income in rural Jamaica

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A Day in The Life of an International Development Consultant

Churning Out a Complex Development Solution                                                          from an Off the Beaten Path Business Model

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Today is Day 2 designing a complex social solution.

It is 3:45 am and I’ve just torn myself away from the bathroom mirror.   It is the end of another quick check in on the cute things about my face; and that intense― get-ready-to- work hunt for invisible whiteheads.

You won’t find me reading the news, and checking Emails this morning.

Questions, outcomes, statistics, theories of change, assumptions, metrics, strategies, tactics, and partnerships for ensuring the intervention delivers the intended and desired change are running around in my head.

There goes the reason the bed cannot hold, even after a short visit.

Costing the solution, identifying traditional and creative funding sources are dragging, spinning, loading, rumbling, and pausing in my head like the computer left running last night and the night before.  A kind of abuse that happens to the computer once in a blue moon; but just another super bootcamp for my brain.

I’d set the clock for two, but can’t remember hearing it alarm.  Strange! I checked the alarm button― ahem, someone had turned if off.  And that someone is me!

None of my associates are engaged on this project, it is just my partnering-client and I.  Our last WhatsApp meeting ended after 11:00 last night.  Earlier that day we had a      2-hour marathon interrogating the results chain, and theory of change for the program that will be supported by eight complex projects. That session broke the new idea dam, leaving a rush of idea flow to follow me to bed.  The play for connecting all the dots, spotting the risks, and opportunities are flowing in both our heads. He can now see― how his idea could work.  It has exploded from three themes to eight, each with a supporting project, a multi-sector approach, desired partners, real-time change & benefits, gender lens, wealth generation, and environmental interventions―Whoa!

That is the beauty, reward, and tax for planning such interventions with the end in mind; with the intended beneficiaries at the center; with what success looks like and how it will be measured.  Day 2 is― Day 3 in reality. A group of us had done a virtual brainstorm and backcasting at the second genesis of it all.

It seems never-ending, planning-in opportunities for learning, curating lessons learnt, and plugging them back into strategy and execution for driving success and innovation. Finding creative ways to ensure rights, duties, and responsibilities can be upheld and are affordable in terms of cost related to behavior change and actions.

woman-2994536_research thinkIt’s clear―planning like this makes no bones about disrupting regular sleep and office time. Passion, and deep connections serve to wake you up, and keep you chained to the computer, library, or phone; and web meetings occur long past regular work hours. Research into similar interventions, stakeholder needs, national plans and strategy documents, newspaper articles, dialogue, questions, calls for additional organizational information, re-reading and checking for risks, ambitions, and opportunities― feels endless.

But I’ll complete the results chain by 5:45 am.  Well that’s what I thought!  I am still integrating the financial viability component, I developed after a meeting of minds with my fellow consultant in the Fintech Sector.  This is when the imagination can get wild dreaming up the glimmer and glam of gamified interventions plus real self-sufficiency, financing, stakeholders, and owners that can be brought to the intervention.

My mind pulls up a scene from FAME ( the American TV Show I love), Solid Gold, a Jamaican Festival Performance, an NDTC Production, then a Chorale by The University Singers (UWI, Mona), the Jamaican Folk Singers, and of course a Production at the Julliard School (New York) ―I can see the hook and entertainment unfold in the solution for a complex social problem.  It is now six thirty-seven, and I am still on the results chain. I am also watching the clock; I need to pounce on an opportunity in Stuttgart (6 hours ahead of Toronto).

This is gung-ho backed by strategic thinking and intimate knowledge of the problem. Ever heard of gung-ho backed by strategic thinking? Like multi-tasking we are on top of this one. Trick is― you have to know when and what you can take on together, in both cases.

Energy is high and I could grow the intervention even bigger, but I know that beast must be contained― before complex kills both productivity and the goose that will lay the golden eggs.

Big vision, big dream, big picture, BIG is how we think.  But there goes that voice with the cold splash of wisdom, whispering― SMART, doable, less pain Meegan!  “Too complex―what do you mean?” “It is very doable”.  Ah, no problem, as my client-partner and I go through the crucial questions, reflect, share feedback, and negotiate the programme scope I’ll be reined in somewhat―yes, only somewhat.  That is the trouble with partnering this way, versus a regular client-service provider partnership.

Goodness gracious me, it is minutes to eight, “Looks like exercise isn’t going to happen today”.  I have a sales pipeline to check in on, publication coordination to act on, other solutions to deliver. I make a somewhat shaky resolve to exercise if it is even midnight tonight―we’ll see. Results chain finally done, hurray.  But I’m getting a vibe to get deeper into the costing― “hold your horses, Mam, that is not on your agenda for today”.

It is almost 10:00 am. My eyes take their on-the-hour dart to the clock; first the one on the computer; then the one strategically positioned across the room from my desk. That is the one I trust, maybe because the numbers are bigger it seems to be more accurate in my mind―lol.  The excitement, and extra work on the brain leaves me peckish more often. I am very hungry at ten instead of at one or two in the afternoon.   I still have the executive summary for the project to write, so I am still chained to that deliverable.

Crunchy Chicken piece

Brain rebellion sets in―I want to do something fun, to eat my lunch, crunchy chicken at the top of mind and taste buds. Haven’t had that in a long time. The crave is the price I pay for not exercising, eating, or sleeping on time.  A cup of hot chocolate rescues me from the hauntings for a while.

I yield to hunger and a power nap at 11:00 am.   At 1:00 pm, I have a face-to-face work meeting.  Two hours later I settle down to check Emails, send a reminder about an overdue account, produce creatives for marketing, double check my sales pipeline, and things to do list― I want to make sure nothing important is being left behind.

6:00 pm: half-an-hour executive to executive give back.

7:00 pm:  supper and family chit chat.

8:00 pm:  quick meeting, followed by work on the proposal, and plan for tomorrow.

10:00 pm: Modified exercise, household chores, get ready for bed and tomorrow.

Some days, the flow is not orderly textbook style in this kind of operation, things can get productively messy, and healthy goes on pause―that is reality!

Thanks for having read.. Share your experience of the all but typical day.

Copyright © 2019 Meegan Scott, Magate Wildhorse.  All rights reserved

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Marketing Change: Climate Resilience & Green Fund Programs

Marketing Change Climate Resilience

Be with us

for the webinar

“Marketing Change: Climate Resilience & Climate Fund Programs”

Join us on Wednesday, April 17, 2019 at 10:00 AM

Presenter: Meegan Scott

Duration: 45 mins. (Including Q & A).

You are welcome to submit challenges and concerns you have regarding the topic prior to the event.

Get on the early birds list. 

Request your invitation to the webinar now, click here.

Looking forward to sharing with you!

The event is brought to you by Magate Wildhorse Ltd.

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