Virtual Roundtable — Chamber of Commerce, Businesses & Trade Experts

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OVERVIEW

Visible minority businesses and visible majority businesses and the industries they serve have been plunged into crisis as a result of SARS-CoV-2.

While some industries and businesses are facing existential challenges, others are booming. Still there are old industries to be resurrected and new ways for bringing those under threat into new or expanded supply chains.

As the pandemic linger and continue to flip  economic and social norms practitioners and researchers in trade, business, research, policy and international development must engage and work more closely together for driving rapid adaption, understanding of trends and helping countries to leverage and seize diaspora capital and pathways to new markets.

Economic development clusters, producers of geographical indications (GIs) and creative industry service providers must meet to discuss and plan the way forward.

This session aims to translate high level briefings to actions, policy and strategy directions for Chambers of Commerce and their members ― both established and diaspora entities (various diasporas and chambers).

Participants will be able to share challenges and opportunities with experts; as well as learn from experts.  The Roundtable will explore and discuss novel solutions and best practices for keeping sustainable trade, and safe supplies flowing in addition to leveraging diasporas, home and cultural knowledge for diaspora and domestic market economic recovery and growth.

Practitioners in international trade, development and businesses will create their network map and agree novel ways of working together and harvesting best and emergent practices for business and driving international trade while building stronger resilient organizations.

Industry focus: Climate finance, agri-business and foods, high value manufacturing, crafts, fashion, fragrance, healthcare, the creative industries, development consulting, and education

On the agenda, participants will discuss:

Tour of Chamber Economic Impacts and recovery: The impact of COVID-19 on diaspora and established chambers of commerce and their members. What are some new and proposed business models for stronger businesses during and post the coronavirus crisis challenging period and develop robust post-crisis business models?

Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence and Technology Adaption: It is clear that technology and its adaption saves human lives as well as businesses. But creating awareness on what and how for SMEs is often at a cost that widens the chasm of access and inequalities.  How can Chambers and development organizations work together to make facilitate awareness creation, reskilling and adaption?  What resources exist for reducing the barriers of access and cost of adaption?

Diaspora Capital, Economic Development Clusters & Sustainable Development: COVID-19 have left us little choice other than to build trust, collaborate and cooperate.   Finding local and global solutions requires that we meet, connect and risk it together for profit and growth.

How can industry clusters, chambers and development professionals  collaborate, facilitate capacity building and investment flow for driving innovation that contributes to long-term viability, sustainability and harmonious societies?

Dates and Times

Times are listed as EST [New York, Toronto, Jamaica] the Eastern Caribbean is now one hour ahead of North America and Jamaica

Monday November 16, 2020 – 2:00 – 3:35  PM EST

Tuesday, November 17, 2020  | 10:00 – 11:45  AM EST

Wednesday, November 18, 2020   –  1:00 PM EST – 2:45  PM EST

Friday, November 20, 2020   –  10:00 AM EST – 11:45  AM EST

Registration Form

(Click the words Registration Form above)

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Brought you by Magate Wildhorse Inc., New York in partnership with Magate Wildhorse Ltd, Toronto, The Community of Practice of Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs (The CoP), Caribbean Diaspora Professional Business Association (CDPBA, and the Pan African Chamber of Commerce.

Copyright © 2020 by Meegan Scott, Magate Wildhorse Ltd .(Toronto), Magate Wildhorse Inc.,(New York). All rights reserved.

Investment Opportunities: Medical Trials, Proteins, Phytotherapy, Therapeutics, Ethnopharmacology Industries—Jamaica & Barbados

 

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We never waste the topics we bring to our Conference or Trade Show so we bring you a discussion on investment opportunties in Jamaica.

Focus areas:

Clinical Trials (Medical Research Solutions)—UWI Mona

Investment Opportunities in the  Proteins, Phytotherapy, Therapeutics, Ethnopharmacology Industries

Jamaica & Barbados

We heard from Dr. Wendy Cukier, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson on

“Innovation Commercialization and the Creation of Intellectual Property from the Perspective of university-based incubators and accelerators”.

Now we take you the Caribbean for another conversation.

Join us Tuesday, November 17, 2020  @ 7:00 PM EST

When leading academic experts

Dr. Sylvia Mitchell

Head of the Medicinal Plant Biotechnology Research (UWI, Mona)

&

Dr. Cohall

Deputy Dean Pre-Clinical Sciences and Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology (UWI, Cavehill)

Discuss investment opportunities, health and economic solutions in the Proteins, Phytotherapy, Therapeutics Industry—Jamaica

 

Keep your radio dials on WBCA FM 102.9 to hear

Loreen Walker

Attorney-at-LawUWI, deliver the BIDEM promise of a walk-through opportunities related to medical trials for researchers and businesses looking to support their disruption strategy in Jamaica.

Coming to you live on  Showcase, You and Your Biz

Brought to you by Magate Wildhorse Inc., New York,  Caribbean Diaspora Connect, The CoP, and WBCA FM 102.9.

Register to receive a link to participate in the Show.

Registration Form (Click the hyperlink)

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Not in Boston or won’t be available and can’t stand to miss a minute?

Register by clicking on the words registration form.

Got a question? Message us.

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Copyright © 2020 by Meegan Scott, Magate Wildhorse Ltd .(Toronto), Magate Wildhorse Inc.,(New York). All rights reserved.

News Release: Co-Leader, Decade of Evaluation for Action to Address Jamaican Diaspora Stakeholder Engagement for the National M & E System

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TORONTO, Canada – Khalil Bitar, Co-leader, Decade of Evaluation for Action and Chair, EvalYouth Global Network, Johannes (Jan) VOORDOUW, Monitoring and Evaluation Systems Design Consultant and  Andrea “Delcita” Wright, Actress and Guidance Counsellor will be guest speakers at the “Jamaican Diaspora Stakeholder Engagement for the National M & E System”  which will be held today, July 30, 2020 at 2:00 pm.

Mr. Bitar will bring greetings on behalf of the Co-leaders for the Decade of EVALUATION for Action, also known as the Eval4Action campaign. “The campaign is aligned with the UN Secretary-General’s Decade of Action to deliver the Global Goals (UN Sustainable Development Goals, also known as the SDGs).

The Eval4Action campaign “seeks to promote widespread recognition on evaluation being critical to, and a key accelerator for achieving the SDGs. It will mobilize commitments by different stakeholders – parliaments, governments, and evaluation associations – to invest in stronger evaluation systems to inform public policies, ensuring no one is left behind” (https://www.eval4action.org/)

The campaign also raises awareness about the lack of evaluation evidence in the Voluntary National Reviews presented to the United Nations High Level Political Forum by developed and developing countries.  It also champions the need for building evaluation capacity— including monitoring and evaluation systems, which are critical to the delivery of the goals.

Columbia, Mexico, and Venezuela were among the first 17 countries to present Voluntary National Reviews in 2016, and the only Latin American countries to do so (UN ECLAC). Canada, Jamaica, The Bahamas, and The Dominican Republic reported in 2018, the third round of reporting. While the United Kingdom submitted their first report in 2019. Fifty-one countries were preparing their reports in February 2020.

“Eval4Action is envisaged as a highly inclusive campaign that is led by civil society for the achievement of these objectives, with global coordination and support by the co-leaders”. UNFPA Evaluation Office, EvalYouth Global Network and Global Parliamentarians Forum for Evaluation are the co-leaders. Local action for delivering the goals as well as for ensuring issues unique to countries and their citizenries such as unique challenges faced by Jamaica, and its diaspora both mutually and independently require actions and commitment by individual diasporans, businesses and diaspora organizations says, Meegan Scott of Magate Wildhorse Consulting event host and Eval4Action campaign partners.

Eval4Action aims to “revitalize global engagement and commitment on national evaluation capacities for timely delivery of the SDGs”. Today’s event aims to ensure all Jamaicans can own, contribute, and benefit from the process.

Diaspora organizations public and private must generate data and engage in evaluation so Jamaica and host countries can meet the “the key UN principles for constructing national reviews”. That requires “rigorous evaluations based on evidence,  and informed by data which is high-quality, accessible, timely, reliable and disaggregated by income, sex, age, race, ethnicity, migration status, disability and geographic location and other characteristics relevant to the context of the diaspora and beneficiaries of programmes it funds in Jamaica.

Johannes (Jan) VOORDOUW, the consultant engaged by the Government of Jamaica for delivering the M & E System will facilitate the stakeholder engagement session. He is also a Director of the Board of Caribbean Evaluators International (CEI), an international partner in the Eval4Action campaign.  The CEI is registered in Jamaica with chapters in other Caribbean countries.

Andrea “Delcita” Wright will bring humour as well as serious conversation through her session “ “Genderation Revue” . She will address Jamaica’s unique context and manifestations of the challenges related SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”; and SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Results-based strategy planning that is grounded in systems thinking and informed by evidence is also crucial to the delivering the goals. Dr. Karren Dunkley will present, North East Diaspora Strategic Planning: Ensuring Productivity & Success in a “ Soon Come” Mindset and Mentality Frame.

With just 10 years for fixing some of world’s most “wicked problems” , when both developed and developing countries were off target to varying degrees before and now dangerously off  track as a result of the COVID _19 pandemic the need for action is urgent.

Delivering the SDGs are crucial to improving the wellbeing of people, planet, and prosperity, but it requires  partnerships like we have never needed it before― if “no one is to be left behind”.

The event is hosted by Magate Wildhorse Consulting and The Community of Practice for Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs. Today’s event partners are the Co-leaders of Eval4Action,  the Jamaica Diaspora Northeast USA, Windsor West Indian Association, the Jamaican Canadian Association Alberta as well as several ethnic media outfits.

Magate Wildhorse is committed to partnering and delivering influential evaluations for the goals.

There is no charge for participating in the event. Individuals with no Jamaican roots but who identify as Jamaicans are welcome to participate in the event.

Pre-registration is required via the following link: https://forms.gle/5CWkWZyUekRcDAr28

For questions, email: magate.wildhorse@gmail.com

Or visit the event links at:

https://magatewildhorse.ca/jamaican-diaspora-stakeholder-engagement-for-national-m-e-system

https://www.facebook.com/events/317139716007839/

https://www.instagram.com/p/CDKtzxXh5xx/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link

https://twitter.com/MagateWildhorse/status/1287922436890132480?s=20

Event flyer

Event participants are being ask to pre-register at the link included in the release above.

PDF Version of Release

 

Nonprofit Governance and Response for Outriding COVID 19

Governance Edition Outride COVID 19

Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar

“Embracing risk for driving vision and growth”

You are invited to join us for series four in the Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar.

This edition entitled Nonprofit Governance and Response for Outriding COVID 19          is also grounded in the theme risk intelligence.

  • Find out how to create and preserve value during crisis
  • Considerations around crisis strategy planning ―short-term ―long term
  • Performance management, results
  • Evidence-based planning, evaluation, learning and improvement
  • Risk intelligence maturity
  • Learn how to leverage risk intelligence for boosting funding readiness
  • How to assess your risk culture and risk appetite
  • Getting ready for the next unexpected crisis
  • Check-in on Gender Equality, WEE and the impact of COVID 19 on Agency and Authority
  • Virtual business exhibition
  • Networking and fun

 Featured sessions:

  1.  Risk Intelligence for Outriding COVID 19 — Key Questions, Practical Responses for SMEs  with Leo M. Tilman, author of  Agility: How to Navigate the Unknown and Seize Opportunity in a World of Disruption. Leo is a leading expert on risk, strategy, and finance.

  2. Diaspora and Caribbean Non-profit Governance for Outriding COVID-19                 Meegan Scott, Strategic Management Consultant, Magate Wildhorse
  3. Panel Discussion & Comparative Cases Mainstream vs. Diaspora, Host, Home & Diaspora Opportunities with Andrew Sharpe of Authentic Caribbean Foundation, Boston, Philip Bedward of Pathways, New York, Tannisha Scarlett,  Life Media Productions Ltd (F.I.L.M. Productions Ltd.) and Agri Views, Jamaica
  4. Joy Spot, with Theo Chambers of CaribAcademy and Co-founder of Positive Tourism News (Jamaica) will deliver the Joy Spot, Motivational Talk

Event features: Joy Spot activity, Mouth and Mind discussion, COVID 19 business community experiences (open mic―diaspora, in Caribbean, other representatives of BAME or mainstream peers), Elevator pitches (The first 20 registered to per series), networking session

Programme & Speakers

  •  Theo Chambers, The Joy Spot
  • Philip Bedward of Pathways will lead on Comparative Cases Mainstream vs. Diaspora
  • Andrew Sharpe will lead on Diaspora, Host, Home & Diaspora Opportunities, USA
  • Rudi Page will lead on Diaspora, Host, Home & Diaspora Opportunities, UK
  • Tannisha Scarlett  will share on Home to Diaspora Opportunities (Jamaica), with a special focus on agribusiness
  • Meegan Scott, Moderator, producer and speaker on Diaspora and Caribbean Non-profit Governance for Outriding COVID-19

ProgramME Outride Governance Series

 

Be with us for this diaspora business and non-profit leaders’ event.

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When: May 7, 2020  | 2:00 PM Eastern, Toronto & New York

Where: Online

Registration Options

New to the series

To receive your access link to the seminar please register at the link below if you missed series 1 last Thursday.

https://forms.gle/PtpZAT8czWYExWpZ7

Returning attendee

Email us at magate.wildhorse (at)gmail.com  or click here.                                                Copy and paste the following in the subject line and body of your Email                          “Register me for Nonprofit Governance and Response for Outriding COVID 19 ”  please include your name.

Procurement officers and buyers in search of COVID 19 and other supplies are welcome to participate.

Outride: COVID 19 Business Threat Seminar is a global disapora entrepreneurs affair!                                                                                                                            Leaders of mainstream businesses with an interest in doing business with diaspora entrepreneurs are welcome to register for the match making and networking sessions.

Please note that this event is not just for small and micro-businesses, big businesses and big nonprofits can benefit also.

stay-home Contact less delivery

Click here to view the series shedule.

May 7, 2020                                                                                                                Series 4: Nonprofit Governance and Response

Special SME segment – Risk Intelligence with Mr. Leo M. Tilman

May 14, 2020                                                                                                            Series 5: Diaspora Supply Chain― Who’s Who

Brought to you by Magate Wildhorse Consulting, and The Community of Practise for Caribbean Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Home of BIDEM Conference & Trade Show)

Advance or maintain the progress.

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The Case for Urgent Corona Virus & Infectious Disease Related Labour Law Review

An incident that influenced this edition. That entity ended up with an employee contracting and dying of COVID 19

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AVAILABLE! COVID-19 HEALTHCARE SUPPLIES

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We’ve partnered with reputable certified entities to ensure you have the hard to source COVID-19 healthcare supplies (disposables) and equipment you need to reduce coronavirus related health risk.

Now available for purchase:

We stand firmly against price gouging and will secure the best prices for quality supplies.

Among the items available are:

  1. Disposable surgical masks
  2. Protective coverall
  3. Gloves non-sterile
  4. Gloves
  5. Gloves sterile
  6. FFP2 -(N95 )
  7. FFP3
  8. N95
  9. Gas Mask
  10. Gas mask filter
  11. Hand Sanitizer— ISO 14001:2009; ISO 22716:2007; ISO 9001:2008; CE certificate
  12. 3 ply Masks – Surgical and Non-Surgical FFP2 Quality
  13. Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer
  14. Ventilator (Artificial Respirator Machine)
  15. Covid-19 Test Kits

If you buy on behalf of a pharmacy, hospital, health region, donor, retail outlet or other entity you’ll want to get in touch today! Supplies go quickly.

Available internationally!

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Gender in Development Work, Is It Really New?

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Gender as a key consideration in development work is not new.

It is just being given greater consideration across different sectors and by more actors.

There is  also a shift in the primary, if not singular focus on the challenges and inequities faced by women and girls to include issues, impacts, and challenges faced by men and boys.

In fact, gender and development has been a topic in academic circles since the 1950s. It gained greater popularity and saw more forward action in the 1970s.

So, is it new to the Caribbean?

Absolutely not, as in the global community there is a greater focus and increased consideration by more actors in development.  One need not go further than The Message (1976), by Neville Martin which included political praise for  Jamaica’s Employment (Equal Pay for Men and Women) Act of 1975.

The lines “He gave I a message to all those people who nuh love progress, say to jook them with land lease, say to jook with land lease, jook them with the pioneer corps, jook them with the pioneer corps,  jook them with JAMAL, then you jook them with free education, jook them with free education, equal pay for women, equal pay for women”; jook them with the minimum wage”. Speaks to gender consideration in development in Jamaica for at least four decades.

In 1998, I joined the USAID funded ACES Project of the Construction Resource and Development Centre (CRDC), a Jamaican not-for-profit and Environmental NGO, that was established in 1983 to deliver and support work for improving shelter standards in Jamaica and the Caribbean.

Gender was a key component in the development of all training materials, social marketing, design and development of solutions, as well as in the management arrangement for solutions to be administered by community groups― where applicable.

The Women’s Construction Collective (WCC), a successful project of the CRDC, also established in 1983, with the purpose being― to provide employment, as well as to increase and improve the status and participation of women in Jamaica’s construction sector is another example of gender consideration.  The first cohort comprised of women from the inner-city community of Tivoli Gardens in Jamaica.

WCC shared compound with CRDC and part of my responsibility was to manage the information center that was served by both entities. In fact, though I was on a contract to the ACES Project (Advancing Cooperation for Water, Sanitation, Health and Environment), I quickly came to learn that once with CRDC you were expected to support and promote all its projects, current, and independent. With that came the opportunity to support the WCC and WHAL (The Women’s Housing Advice Line), and the Sanitation Support Unit (SSU).

Given, the connection between water, sanitation, health, hygiene, environment, women, shelter, and disaster mitigation (all areas of priority focus for CRDC)― it made sense that the projects were designed to support each other; and that together they provided a wholistic approach to problem solving under the CRDC banner, as well as through their individual operations.

The Sanitation Support Unit (based in Montego Bay),  was an Urban Environmental Sanitation Program. SSU was also funded by USAID, and as with the ACES Project, the Environment Health Project (EHP) was the Washington DC, based USAID implementing partner.

SSU worked with communities across Jamaica and was a key co-implementation partner to the ACES Project, though its core catchment communities were Rose Heights and Norwood in Montego Bay.

The  focus of SSU was the provision of:

  • safe and affordable sanitation solution that suit the protected the environment (hence the introduction of the VIP latrines, and upgraded models developed under the ACES Project).
  • hygiene and behavior change training, solutions, and improved sanitation infrastructure for improved health;
  • training in related areas, and the delivery of solutions related to safe-rooves and retrofitting of on its own as well as in collaboration with ACES;
  • the disposal of solid waste, food safety, black and grey water were addressed by both projects, and in all instances and for every intervention gender consideration, and gender responsive solutions were a big consideration.

Gender in development is therefore not new, and certainly not new in the Caribbean. My experience at CRDC is also not the only one, but it was among the earliest.

Planners and programme designers have been including gender in development interventions for decades. However, with the growth of the evaluation movement, greater focus on equity and inclusion by donors, and gender mainstreaming as public policy in many jurisdictions has resulted in increased interest and advanced application of gender in development.

Courses such as “Equity-focused and Gender-responsive evaluation”, delivered by EvalPartners, in collaboration with UNICEF, and the International Organization for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE), has also served to increase the consciousness of evaluators and planners, alike when it comes to including gender in development interventions.

Increased focus on development interventions in the sphere of Market Systems Development is also driving the popularity and integration of gender in development in the developing world.

So, why did I even think it necessary to write this post?

I have found that many individuals in human resources, and contractors are very excited by the concept and for some it seems so new that they are in doubt that there are significant pools of individuals with experience in applying gender in development in the developing as well as the developed world.

I have also found that some professionals new to development work or performance management and measurement seem to believe this is a new concept and practice.

While it might be a big deal, it is certainly not new.

Thank you for sharing your early journey into the sphere of gender and development.

We look forward to hearing stories from Canada, the Caribbean, and the developing world in particular.

By Meegan Scott

 


Glossary

Who nuh love progress – who do not like or act to support progress

Jook – jab, poke, or slap (used figuratively in post and song)

Land Lease – A programme aimed a redistribution of land and income in rural Jamaica

Proud to Be Part of Outsource to the Caribbean Conference 2017

We are proud to be a part of this historic event.